Attorney-Client Privilege (Litigator Series) LandMark Publications

ISBN:

Published: August 25th 2014

Kindle Edition


Description

Attorney-Client Privilege (Litigator Series)  by  LandMark Publications

Attorney-Client Privilege (Litigator Series) by LandMark Publications
August 25th 2014 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | | ISBN: | 5.54 Mb

THIS CASEBOOK contains a selection of 106 U. S. Court of Appeals decisions that interpret and apply the attorney-client privilege. The selection of decisions spans from 2008 to the date of publication.The Common Law Exemption[T]he attorney-clientMoreTHIS CASEBOOK contains a selection of 106 U.

S. Court of Appeals decisions that interpret and apply the attorney-client privilege. The selection of decisions spans from 2008 to the date of publication.The Common Law Exemption[T]he attorney-client privilege, [is] the oldest of the privileges for confidential communications known to the common law. Upjohn Co. v. United States, 449 U.S. 383, 389, 101 S.Ct. 677, 66 L.Ed.2d 584 (1981). The privilege protects from disclosure confidential communications made between attorneys and clients for the purpose of obtaining or providing legal assistance to the client.

In re Grand Jury, 705 F.3d at 151. Although the communications are often relevant and highly probative of the truth, they are protected in order to encourage full and frank communication between attorneys and their clients and thereby promote broader public interests in the observance of law and administration of justice.

Upjohn Co., 449 U.S. at 389, 101 S.Ct. 677. In re Grand Jury Subpoena, 745 F.3d 681 (3rd Cir. 2014).FOIA ExemptionsFOIA [The Freedom of Information Act] requires government agencies to make available final opinions... as well as orders, statements of policy and interpretations which have been adopted by the agency, and administrative staff manuals and instructions ...

that affect a member of the public. 5 U.S.C. § 552(a)(2). FOIA exemptions allow agencies to withhold information from disclosure if it has been properly classified under criteria established by Executive order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign policy, id. § 552(b)(1) (Exemption 1), and inter-agency or intra-agency memorandums or letters which would not be available by law to a party other than an agency in litigation with the agency, id.

§ 552(b)(5) (Exemption 5). Exemption 5 covers material that would be protected from disclosure in litigation under one of the recognized evidentiary or discovery privileges, such as the attorney-client privilege. Pub. Citizen, Inc. v. Office of Mgmt. & Budget, 598 F.3d 865, 874 (D.C.Cir.2010) (citing Coastal States Gas Corp.

v. Dept of Energy, 617 F.2d 854, 862 (D.C.Cir.1980)). The deliberative process privilege is one of the litigation privileges incorporated into Exemption 5. It allows an agency to withhold all papers which reflect the agencys group thinking in the process of working out its policy and determining what its law shall be.

Sears, 421 U.S. at 153, 95 S.Ct. 1504 (quotations omitted). Electronic Frontier Foundation v. Dept. of Justice, 739 F. 3d 1 (DC Cir. 2014)



Enter the sum





Related Archive Books



Related Books


Comments

Comments for "Attorney-Client Privilege (Litigator Series)":


grafik-lodz.com.pl

©2009-2015 | DMCA | Contact us